A timely revelation.

A timely revelation.

First Twenty Miler (Of This Training Cycle)

Was supposed to hit my first 20 mile run yesterday.  It wasn’t a pretty run.  Achilles are still cut up from the racing flats, so I ran in my trainers.  It’s weird having to adjust for a heavy shoe again.  Makes me feel sluggish, and I’m worried I missed my peak by a month.

It was a beautiful day for the run.  Just enough overcast (there was a threat of rain, but we got none) that the heat of the sun wasn’t too pounding.  Even carrying water (first time this training cycle) I still felt pretty dehydrated (I don’t think the hangover from an overly successful St. Patrick’s day helped much).  And so I ended up walking far too much.

The craziness, though, was around mile 17.  During one of the many walking breaks.  Listening to my audiobook, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell.  Out of nowhere this punk kid runs up behind me and smacks me in the side of the head, missing my eye by a half inch.  And then runs off.  If it had been anything less than the twenty I might have chased after him, but as it was, I was just far too exhausted.

And that ended my run.  Head was jarred, body beat, ankles bloody from the open cuts, I went home and called it a night.  If it wasn’t for the runners high, I don’t know how I would still be in any sort of cheerful mood.  That flood of endorphins managed to keep me from being much more than confused, and a little depressed at the state of the world.  It also put me in a place to know that it was in one of the more “depressed” (this is East Lansing after all) areas, and I can take a smug bitter joy in knowing that sure he may have gotten one hit in on me, and ruined my day, but society is going to take an indifferent joy in beating him down the rest of his life.  Bittersweet victory I suppose.

Today is a rest day, so I’ll be doing that, and trying to remind myself to hydrate.  Then tomorrow it’s back out to run again, because seriously, fuck that situation, it’s not going to stop me.

Post Run Verdict

Ok… ow.

First: the new shoes run great.  Great strike, low weight, flexible, breathable.  Everything I’ve been looking for.  Both shoes weigh less than one of my trainers.

Second: They rub like godawful hell on my achilles.  It’s not bad enough to stop using them, but it is bad enough that it put the kibosh on my 8 mile run tonight around mile 4.  Will try again tomorrow but with bandaids and taller socks on the back to see if I can cut down on the rub.

In other news, this unseasonably warm weather means I need to reevaluate my fluid intake, and realize that I’m not holding water like I did over the winter.  Basically a diet of coffee and oatmeal is not going to cut it.  From now on the waterbottle is my friend, and will be with me (and full) at all times.

My first 20 miler is this weekend, and I’m determined to take the Universes out for that run, so hopefully tomorrow’s run will be better.

NEW SHOES!

AAAAAAAH!!!! My new shoes just arrived!! Mizuno Wave Universe 4s.

Now if only 5 o’clock would roll around faster so I can go get an 8 mile in…

Great inspiration, closing in on the first of my dreaded twenties this sunday.
run2behappy:

It’s crazy how once upon a time 5 miles was a dreaded distance and now I love those runs…

Great inspiration, closing in on the first of my dreaded twenties this sunday.

run2behappy:

It’s crazy how once upon a time 5 miles was a dreaded distance and now I love those runs…

A day with the worst run is infinitely better than a day without a run.

A Runner’s Orthodoxy - A Post-Mystical Alternative to Established Religion (Proposal)

I’m working on a rough thesis, here, with only the most preliminary of research behind it.  At this point it’s mostly observational and reflective on my own experience with running and losing my faith.  Eventually I’d like to expand it with research and anecdotes from fellow skeptics and athletes.

I don’t like the phrase “losing my faith.”  It has a far too theistic of a slant, and far too negative a connotation.  It implies a greater loss, rather than a greater gain.  If anything, the experience has left me a more reflective individual, more spiritual, though less reliant on non verifiable desire-based experiences.  That story though, my journey from faith to skepticism is not the story here.  Suffice it to say that it happened on a run while listening to Dawkins’ book, The God Delusion, an imperfect text though one that offers a healthy challenge.

What I’m working on here is an alternative to mystical, and oppressively dogmatic theologies.  A belief structure based on a celebration of the evolutionary trait that made us superior to other species, regardless of other shortcomings.  A belief structure built on the spiritual euphoria endurance.  A religion whose only exclusion is laziness.

Athleticism as a pseudo religion is very well-documented.  Jeffrey Fry paints a beautiful picture of running as faith in his essay “Running Religiously” in the book Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind, a book I would highly recommend, and will probably be drawing from heavily when I do get around to writing.  For any runner, trying to explain the need for running, that daily rededication of faith in 3, 5, 10 miles, to a non runner is akin to the experience of an evangelical trying to sell their faith to a hardened skeptic.  The worshipful state of the runner’s high is something that has to be experienced to be believed.  That gilded edge it gives to the world is diminished in its explanation.  The flagellation of knees and shins and feet to the nonbeliever is an unexplainable torture.

Running too, has been posited and well documented as the evolutionary leg up that humans had on competing species.  A google search of “distance running evolution” turns up nearly 3 million results (most probably crap) on human endurance being the key to our early evolutionary success.  I propose then that running now, and distance running especially is a celebration much akin to worshipping a creator deity.  An acknowledgment of our origins and prowess, and an affirmation of our dedication to continuing the process.

Some of my initial resources will be Michael Shermer’s The Believer’s Brain, a book that provides (at least in its earlier parts) an interesting examination of the neurochemistry and psychology of belief and building belief, and worship (later on he gets a little dogmatic and contradictory in his drum beating of libertarianism).  Particularly his discussion on the “sensed-presence effect” I think might provide a certain scalable discussion on the experience of “god” many religious runners profess.  Also I’m working with Dan Dennett’s explanation of the memetic evolution of religion as a sort of linear ancestor to running as faith.  His book Breaking The Spell I think should provide a healthy amount of information there.

The celebration that is running, and the physical and psychological effects of it I think provide a healthy base from which one can build a systematic philosophy on life.  I hope to be able to build an orthodoxy that is attainable and desirable that promotes self-reflection and healthy living.  A worship of miles and blisters and sore muscles.  More to come.

If this song doesn’t make you want to go run…

There are days that I think I need to add more RAM…
wakeupthinspiration:

Running isn’t something you can just quit. It’s a part of you that you can never let go. You can stop running, but you’ll never stop being a runner. :)

There are days that I think I need to add more RAM…

wakeupthinspiration:

Running isn’t something you can just quit. It’s a part of you that you can never let go. You can stop running, but you’ll never stop being a runner. :)

my friend’s boyfriend made this for her after she got home from a run.
It’s great to be a Michigan Wolverine.

my friend’s boyfriend made this for her after she got home from a run.

It’s great to be a Michigan Wolverine.